The Borough of Saltash Great War Memorial 1914-1918

The history below was published by Peter Clements on 4th September 2018. He says: More information regarding most of those named on this WW1 Memorial is available from Saltash Heritage: but, constructive criticism and additional information, especially about those not yet identified, would be very welcome.



Private. Robert Azoff ALFORD. 140501. 14th Battalion, Canadian Infantry who was killed in action on 26 June 1916 aged 28 during the Battle of the Somme.

Robert was the third son of Thomas and Susan Alford, of 6, Symons Rd., Saltash. His grave is in the Railway Dugout, Burial Ground, near Ypres.

He is ‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial: also on the Canadian Memorial in London; the War Memorial in St John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash and on the Family’s Memorial in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Churchyard.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Chief Writer. Harry Pine ANDREWS.90598, H.M.S. Vivid, Royal Navy who died on 16 February 1915.

His wife was Eliza Andrews, of 175, Acacai Avenue, Rockliffe Park, Ottawa, Canada. Harry was born on 25th March 1860 in Saltash, baptised at the church of St Nicholas and St Faith, Saltash on 15th April 1860. He was the youngest son of William Andrews and his wife Elizabeth Pine, both born in Saltash. He entered the Navy on his fifteenth birthday as a Boy Writer and progressed through the ranks to become a Chief Writer at Dartmouth Royal Navy College. In 1910, with his long experience of naval service, Harry went to help set up the new Royal Naval College of Canada. The Canadian Archives show his position in the Canadian Navy as “Schoolmaster”, his British Royal Naval record shows him as a Chief Writer. The loan agreement came to an end on 12th December 1913 and on that date he left the Royal Navy. Then, with the outbreak of war, he was called back to Royal Navy service on 2nd August 1914 and he and his family returned to Saltash. Harry was taken ill, and was transferred to the Royal Naval Barracks at Devonport, so he could be nearer home. He died at the then family home, Holmwood, Saltash, on 16th February 1915, a few weeks short of his 55th birthday. He had served in the Royal Navy for just short of forty years. During his service career he had also served as a Dartmouth Town Councillor. Harry Pine Andrews is buried in the churchyard of St Stephens-by-Saltash, his grave (which is also his wife’s grave).

‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Engine Room Artificer. Arthur BANCROFT, Royal Navy died in the Royal Navy Hospital Great Yarmouth on 13th December 1918 aged 41.

He was born in Leeds and married Beatrice Eleanor STANLEY: the daughter of Charles and Anne Stanley of Tamar Street, Saltash; in 1899. The 1911 Census shows his wife Beatrice E Bancroft, then aged 33 was living at 4 Sea View Terrace, Saltash, with two children: a son Arthur Harold age 11 and daughter Beatrice May age 5. The St. Stephen-by-Saltash Churchyard records show he was buried there on 19th December 1918. His wife died on the 21st December 1948 and is buried in the same grave.

He is “Remembered with Honour” on the Great World War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church.
Not ‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission: an application has been submitted to CWGC for his inclusion.

Lance Sergeant. William Robert BAZLEY. 23390, 10th Bn., Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry who died between the 23rd and 24th October 1917 aged 24 of wounds received during the Battle of the Somme.

He was the son of William Robert and Mary Ann Bazley, of 6, Tamar Street, Saltash. The 1911 England, Wales & Scotland Census shows that in 1911 he was then a 17 year old Fisherman called Willie Alpage Bazley living with his parents.

He is ‘Remembered with Honour’ at the Duhallow Advanced Dressing Station Cemetery near Ypres in Belgium: also on the Great World War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash where his name is shown as Willy Alpheoe Bazley.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as William Robert Bazley and in the Duhallow Advanced Dressing Station Cemetery.

Warrant Electrician. Arthur Watson BEALES. H.M.S. Indefatigable., Royal Navy died on 31 May 1916, age 33.

The husband of Dorothy Beales, of 3, Park Villas, Saltash, Cornwall. HMS Indefatigable was sunk on 31 May 1916 during the Battle of Jutland, she was hit several times in the first minutes of the “Run to the South”, the opening phase of the battle cruiser action. Shells from the German battlecruiser Von der Tann caused an explosion ripping a hole in her hull, and a second explosion hurled large pieces of the ship 200 feet (60m) in the air. Only three of the crew of 1,018 survived.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. William John BEER., 240148, Bugler 1st/5th Bn., Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry died on 31 March 1918. Killed in Action during the Battle of the Somme.

The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 he was then a School Boy, Grocers Errand Boy, age 12, living with his parents Samuel and Harriet, and seven siblings, at 132 Fore Street Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, France. also on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash. The Pozieres Memorial relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8 August 1918. The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the United Kingdom who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Second Lieutenant. Bernard Bennett BISHOP Royal Flying Corps died on 09 September 1917.

Bernard was born on 27th May 1894, the son of Thomas Henry Bertram Bishop then an Engineer-Lieutenant in the Royal Navy and his wife Louisa Caroline. In 1911 the family lived in a house called “Vescovo” in Saltash. Rifleman Bernard Bennett Bishop enlisted in the 6th (City of London) Battalion the London Regiment (Rifles). In May 1916, he was sent to an Officer Cadet school for a course leading to a commission. The then Second-Lieutenant Bishop served with the 5th Battalion the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry. In 1917, Second-Lieutenant Bishop DCLI was attached to the Royal Flying Corps and crossed the Channel in November 1916 to serve in army co-operation squadron reconnaissance duties over the Ypres sector. This area on the Western Front was the scene of the Third Battle of Ypres. Also known as the Battle of Passchendaele. It was one of the major battles of the First World War. On the afternoon of Sunday 9th September 1917 an artillery-spotting aircraft was being flown by Lieutenant A. G. B. Davidson and Second-Lieutenant B. B. Bishop. Also in the air was German Air Force Lt. Paul Baumer, a member of one of the most prestigious German Fighter Squadrons. At 15:25 Baumer engaged and shot down the British artillery-spotting aircraft (his fourth victory). The British aircraft crashed and Davidson and Bishop were killed and buried side by side in Zuydcoote Military Cemetery.

Bernard Bennett BISHOP is ‘Remembered with Honour’ at the Zuydcoote Military Cemetery, also on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Ordinary Telegraphist. Nicholas William John BLAKE. J/32553, H.M.S. Hornet., Royal Navy died on 22 April 1918 Age 19.

Son of Beatrice Louisa and Nicholas James Blake, of 12 Lockyer Terrace, Saltash. On the night of 22–23 April 1918 HMS Hornet was one of a group of Allied Warships in action with Austro-Hungarian Warships. During the engagement HMS Hornet was seriously damaged and suffered four casualties; of which one was Nicholas William John BLAKE.

He is ‘Remembered with Honour’ at the Salonika (Lembet Road) Military Cemetery, Thessaloniki, Greece: and also on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Corporal. Charles BUCKINGHAM. 7393, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment. Killed in action 23 January 1916.

Born in Launceston. Enlisted in Plymouth.

‘Remembered with Honour’ at Y (Wye) Farm Military Cemetery, Bois-Grenier, Nord, France and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. The Y (Wye) Farm Military Cemetery was named after a nearby farm, called by the Army “Y” (or Wye) Farm. It was begun in March 1915 and used by units holding this sector until February 1918. At the Armistice it contained 335 burials, but it was then increased when graves were brought in from the battlefields and from other small cemeteries. Casualty Details now:- UK 529, Canada 24, Australia 163, New Zealand 43, South Africa 3, India 58, Germany 2, Total Burials: 822.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
(No obvious connection to Saltash.)
(Possibly: brother of Petty Officer Stoker John Bartlett BUCKINGHAM.)

Petty Officer Stoker. John Bartlett BUCKINGHAM. 293892, H.M.S. “Brisk.”, Royal Navy who died on 02 October 1917.

Killed in action when his ship was hit by one torpedo amidships causing a catastrophic explosion which broke her in two. Born 14 March 1880 in North Hill, Cornwall. The 1911 Census shows he was living at 117 Fore Street, Saltash and that he was then a Leading Stoker, Royal Navy, aged 31, the husband of Annie Rebecca Buckingham, father of Dora Frances and John, both born in Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
(Possibly: brother of Corporal Charles BUCKINGHAM.)

Second Lieutenant. Ebenezer CHARLESTON. 11th Bn., King’s Royal Rifle Corps who died on 20 September 1917 Age 36.

Son of William John Charleston, of 8, May Terrace, Plymouth; husband of Ernestine Charleston, of Greenbank, Saltash. Notice in the Western Morning News. 6 October 1917. “CHARLESTON. – Killed in action, Sept. 21st, Second Lieutenant E Charleston, K. R. R., beloved husband of E. Charleston (nee Limpenny), Greenbank-Villa, Saltash.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Tyne Cot Memorial near the town of Ieper (Ypres) in Belgium. This Memorial bears the names of some 35,000 men of the British and New Zealand forces who have no known grave, nearly all of whom died between August 1917 and November 1918. This area on the Western Front was the scene of the Third Battle of Ypres. Also known as the Battle of Passchendaele. It was one of the major battles of the First World War. Also on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. Albert Edward CHIVERS. PLY/6874, H.M.S. Carysfort. Royal Marine Light Infantry who died on 13 December 1917 Age 40.

Son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Sarah Chivers, of Bradford-on-Avon, Wilts; husband of Mary Ellen Chivers, of 38, Fore Street, Saltash.
On the 13 December 1917 H.M.S. Carysfort, a Light Cruiser, was damaged in a collision with the Merchant Ship S.S. Glentaise in the North Sea. There were two casualties on H.M.S Carysfort: Private Albert Edward Chivers RMLI Ply 6874 and Private George Wilson RMLI Ply 9192.

Albert Edward Chivers is remembered with honour on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash. Both Royal Marines are ‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Serjeant. Joseph Victor ELLIOTT. 9306, 6th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry who died on 18 August 1916.

Soldiers died in the Great War 1914-1919 Transcription show he was born and resided in Saltash, enlisted in Bodmin and was ‘killed in action’.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Thiepval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash. The Thiepval Memorial commemorates more than 72,000 men of British and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and who have no known grave; the majority died during the Somme offensive of 1916.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. Gilbert Edmund FREEMAN. 16373, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards. Age 22.

Soldiers died in the Great War 1914-1919 Transcription shows he was ‘Killed in Action’ on 16th September 1916.
Son of Matilda Charlotte Freeman and William Osborne Freeman. The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 he was single, age 17; his occupation was ‘assisting in the business’ at 87 Fore Street, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Thiepval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Thiepval Memorial commemorates more than 72,000 men of British and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave, the majority of whom died during the Somme offensive of 1916.

Lieutenant. Frederick GARD. 1st Bn., Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry died on 28 June 1918 age 34.

The son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Gard, of Devonport and husband of Winifred R. Gard, of Collingwood Cottage, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ in the British Military Cemetery Thiennes, Nord, France and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash. ‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The German offensive of April 1918 pushed the front line back in this sector. The British Military Cemetery Thiennes was one of the cemeteries made for Commonwealth burials arising from the fighting in the area. Started in May and closed in August 1918. It contains 114 First World War burials.

Private. Alfred St. Aubyn Scoble GIBSON. 34952. 7th Battalion, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry; died of wounds on 2nd October 1917 age 19.

The son of Mr. Gibson, of 5, Fore Street, Saltash.

Remembered with Honour Dozinghem Military Cemetery Ypres, (Ieper) Belgium and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

In July 1917, in readiness for the forthcoming offensive, groups of casualty clearing stations were put in place. One of these Casualty Clearing Stations was at Dozinghem. The military cemetery there was used until early 1918. There are 3,174 Commonwealth WW1 and 65 German war graves.

Private. Sidney Edward GOULD. 30011. 3rd Depot, 97th, 11th Battery, the Royal Horse & Field Artillery.*

The 1911 Census shows Sidney was born in 1885. He, his father Edward mother Susan and siblings lived at 26 Tamar Street, Saltash. His Service Records show he enlisted in the Royal Artillery at Bodmin in 1903. He served in India from 1906 to 1910 and then entered the Reserve. At the outbreak of WW1 he was called up on the 6th of August 1914 and left for France on the 19th of August 1914 where he served until 7th January 1916. He returned home on the 8th January 16 and was discharged injured on the 18th of January 1916 aged 31. In 1916 he married Ida (Nee Chesterfield) Gould in the St. Austell District. On the 15th of September 1916 he re-enlisted. It’s unclear what happened after that re-enlistment. He died on 10 Dec 1919 aged 34 in Truro Hospital and was buried in St Austell (Watering Hill) Cemetery.

He is ‘Remembered with Honour’ not only on the Borough of Saltash WW1 Memorial, the War Memorials in St. John’s Chapel in St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, the St. Mewan WW1 Memorial and on the Royal Regiment of Artillery War Memorial in London.
Not ‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Royal Horse & Field Artillery was the most numerous arm of the WW1 Artillery, the horse-drawn RFA was responsible for the medium calibre guns and howitzers. It was deployed close to the front line and was reasonably mobile.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) lists three P. G. GILBERT World War One Casualties.
None of these seem to have any connection to Saltash. The three are:-
1. P. G. Gilbert. Cadet. Royal Military College, Sandhurst.
2. Percy George Gilbert. Private. Australian Infantry.
3. Percy George Gilbert. Able Seaman. Royal Navy.
My ‘best guess’ (and it is only a guess) is that it’s:

Able Seaman. Percy George GILBERT. 233033, H.M.S. Defence., Royal Navy who died on 31 May 1916 Age 26.

He was the son of Evelyn Helen Wells (formerly Gilbert), of 12, York Place, Britannia Sq., Worcester, and the late William John Gilbert.
HMS Defence, was sunk at the Battle of Jutland, 31st May 1916. She blew up whilst under heavy fire from the German battleship “Friedrich Der Grosse”. All of her complement of 904 officers and men were lost.

Remembered with Honour on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.
It’s possible that the P. G. Gilbert named on the Borough of Saltash War Memorial is ‘none of the above’ – and is someone else who is not listed by the CWGC.
There is no P. G. Gilbert named on any other WW1 Memorial in Saltash or St. Stephens-by-Saltash to help identify him: nor are the details on the Plymouth Naval Memorial of help.

Private. William George HARDING. 78869, 5th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry who died on 05th October 1918 aged 19.

Son of Mrs. E. E. Harding, of 29, Tamar St., Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ at the Hamburg Cemetery and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

During WW1 the Hamburg Cemetery was used for the burial of over 300 Allied servicemen who died as prisoners of war.
In 1923, it was decided that the graves of Commonwealth servicemen who had died in Germany should be brought together into four permanent cemeteries. Hamburg Cemetery was one of those chosen, and burials were brought into the cemetery from 120 other burial grounds. There are now 708 First World War servicemen buried or commemorated in the Commonwealth plot at Hamburg.

Private. Horace Albert Rawlings HARRIS 85095, 2nd Bn., The King’s (Liverpool Regiment) who died on 13 October 1917 age 27.

Son of Mrs. H. Taylor, of 14, Tamar St., Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ Lahana Military Cemetery and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Lahana Military Cemetery is to the north-east of Thessaloniki, Greece. Begun in July 1916 for burials from the 27th Casualty Clearing Station, to which sick and wounded men were brought from the Struma front. The cemetery was then used from June to August 1917 by the 18th Stationary Hospital. After the Armistice, 41 graves were brought in from front line cemeteries and other small burial grounds. The cemetery now contains 279 Commonwealth 16 Bulgarian and 4 Greek WW1 graves.

Private. Henry Francis HARRIS. 36116, 1st Bn., Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry who died on 24 April 1918, age 20.

Son of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Harris, of Springfield, Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ Merville Communal Cemetery Extension. Nord, France: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Merville Communal Cemetery Extension was used by Commonwealth hospitals. It was made by fighting units, and contained the graves of 38 soldiers from the United Kingdom, who fell in the period April to August 1918. It was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields near Merville. The Extension now contains 920 WW1 Commonwealth burials; 345 of them unidentified.

Private. Fredrick James HAYNE. 40076, 1st Bn., Somerset Light Infantry died on 30 August 1918 Age 19.

Born in Plymouth, enlisted in Liskeard. Son of Mr. W. G., and Mrs. A. A. Hayne, of 4, Brazacott Terrace, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ at the Eterpigny British Cemetery Pas-de-Calais, France; and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Eterpigny: a village in the Department of the Pas-de-Calais, France; was captured by the enemy in March 1918, and recovered at the end of the following August. The British Cemetery was used from the end of August to the middle of October1918 and contains 66 graves.

Petty Officer. Benjamin Pryor JAMES.189105, H.M.S. Monmouth. Royal Navy Killed in Action on 01 November 1914.

Born in Saltash on 8th October 1878. His wife Jessie lived at 25 James Street, Devonport.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas and St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

From the Dingle & Co South East, Cornwall Almanac 1915:- “In November 1914. The Secretary of the Admiralty reported that rumours and reports had been received from various sources of a naval action having taken place in the Pacific, off the Chilean coast. It was stated that the Scharnhorst, Gneisenau, Leipzig, Dresden and Nurenburg concentrated near Valparaiso, and that the engagement was fought with a portion of Admiral Cradock’s squadron on November 1st. The Germans report that the Monmouth was sunk. The news caused a very painful impression in South East Cornwall, as the Monmouth was a west-country ship, and carried a crew of 537.”

Private. Norman KELLY. 3424, 1st/14th Bn., London Regiment (London Scottish) died on 12 October 1915 Age 30.

Son of the late John William and Emily Kelly. Norman was born at Portsmouth on 13th June 1884 and baptized in Saltash 3rd April 1891. His father, the late John William Kelly, had been a Warrant Officer, Carpenter, Royal Navy. The 1891 Census shows Norman, then aged 6, living with his widowed mother, Emily, at 2 Brunel Terrace, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Loos Memorial, Pas-de-Calais département, France and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas and St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Loos Memorial is a WW1 memorial forming the sides and rear of Dud Corner Cemetery. The memorial lists 20,610 names of British and Commonwealth soldiers with no known grave; killed in the area during the Battle of Loos, which started on 25 September 1915 and ended at the end of the war in November 1918.

J. G. C. LAMERTON is named on the Borough of Saltash WW1 Memorial. I can’t find any records anywhere of a LAMERTON J. G. C.
There is, however, a Master at Arms James Henry Glenville LAMERTON. Buried in Saltash Baptist Chapelyard whose grave has a Commonwealth War Graves Commission Headstone.

Master at Arms. James Henry Glenville LAMERTON 117580, H.M.S. Impregnable, Royal Navy who died 01 February 1919. (age 50).

The 1911 Census shows James H. G. LAMERTON, then age 42, was married to Emily Jane Lamerton, they lived with their children at 3 Ashleigh Terrace, Saltash. He was then a Naval Pensioner. Naval Manager of Canteen Army & Navy Co-op. H.M.S. Impregnable was a ‘boys’ training ship until 1929, over the years incorporating a number of different hulk vessels moored at times in either the River Tamar (at Devonport) or Lynher (at Saltash). The WW1 Naval Casualties Transcription shows that he died of disease on 1st February 1919; his home then was The Moorings, Brook Park, Saltash and he was still a Master at Arms, Royal Navy, on HMS Impregnable.

‘Remembered with Honour’ (and buried) in Saltash Baptist Chapelyard: his grave has a CWGC Headstone.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Second Lieutenant. Theodore Samuel S MARSHALL. Royal Engineers. Died on 31 July 1917.

The 1891 England, Wales & Scotland Census gives his age then as 7, living with his parents, Robert & Priscilla, and five siblings: at Underhill Cottage, Portland Road, Devonport. In 1915 he married Ada F. Wintle in the Portsmouth District. On 26th October 1916 Tyne Electrical Engineers. Staff Serjt. Theodore Samuel Marshall was commissioned to 2nd Lt. (on prob.)

The inscription on his grave stone in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Churchyard says:- “Theodore S. S. Marshall. 2nd Lieut. R.E. Tyne. Who died at Colchester July 31st 1917. Aged 33 years. The beloved husband of Ada Florence Marshall and dearly loved youngest son of Robert & Pricilla Marshall of the Glen Port View, Saltash. Thy will be done.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ in St. Stephen’s-By-Saltash (St. Stephen) Churchyard: also on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. Charles Keefe MASEY. 11526, 2nd Battalion, Devonshire Regiment died on 12 March 1915 Age 23.

The 1911 Census shows he was living at 118 Fore Street, Saltash: with parents, James & Elizabeth Masey, and his siblings. A Newspaper cutting says:- “On 26th March 1915. Mr and Mrs Masey. 118 Fore Street, Saltash, received the sad news that their son, Private Charles Masey, 2nd Devons, was killed in the advance of the infantry at the battle of Neuve Chapelle, in Flanders, when the Devons sustained very heavy casualties. He enlisted soon after the outbreak of the War.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Le Touret Memorial. Pas-de-Calais region of France. Also ‘on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Le Touret Memorial commemorates over 13,400 British soldiers who were killed in this sector of the Western Front from the beginning of October 1914 to the eve of the Battle of Loos in late September 1915 and who have no known grave.

Commander. Irving Brock MILES. H.M.S “Vivid”, Royal Navy died on 29 January 1917 age 47.

Husband of Florence A. Miles, of “Tregays”, Avondale Rd., Exmouth. In 1901 the then Lieutenant Miles Royal Navy was a Hydrographer carrying out surveys used for the production of Admiralty navigation charts. In 1907 he joined the Canadian Government Hydrographic Office. In 1910 he was promoted to Commander and retired from Royal Navy. In 1913 he resigned from Canadian Hydrographic Service and returned to the Admiralty as a Commander. He was awarded a British War Medal. When he died in 1917 he was a Commander, Royal Navy, Retired.

‘Remembered with Honour’ (and buried) at Kensal Green (All Souls’) Cemetery, London: also on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. Charles Henry MILLER. 866, 5th Dragoon Guards (Princess Charlotte of Wales’s) died 01 September 1914 aged 30.

The 1901 Census shows that in 1901 he was then a 17 year old Grocers Apprentice: living with his widowed Grandmother, Jane A Cowling age 66, an older sister, a brother, and also living with them were two boarders: at 76 Fore Street. Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ at the Verberie French National Cemetery and on the war Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Verberie was the scene of fierce fighting on the 1st September 1914. There are over 70 WW1 casualties commemorated in this site: of these over a quarter are unidentified. Included are names of twelve men of the 2nd and 5th Dragoon Guards, who fell in the Affair of Nery none of whom could be individually identified and they were all buried in one grave.

Stoker 1st Class. Cyril Wilfred NEWTON. K/17335, H.M.S. Monmouth., Royal Navy who died on 01 November 1914 age 21.

Son of Erving and Bessie Newton, of 3 Essex Terrace, Saltash.
From the Dingle & Co South East, Cornwall Almanac 1915:- On “November 5th 1914. The Secretary of the Admiralty reported that rumours and reports had been received from various sources of a naval action having taken place in the Pacific, off the Chilean coast. It was stated that the Scharnhorst, Gneisenau, Leipzig, Dresden and Nurenburg concentrated near Valparaiso, and that the engagement was fought with a portion of Admiral Cradock’s squadron on November 1st. The Germans report that the Monmouth was sunk. The news caused a very painful impression in South East Cornwall, as the Monmouth was a west-country ship, and carried a crew of 537. From Saltash the men serving on her included C. W. Newton, Stoker, aged 21, single.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and also on the War Memorial in St. Johns Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Stoker 2nd Class. Edward John NICHOLSON. K/28406, H.M.S. “Defence, Royal Navy died on 31 May 1916 Age 21.

Son of Edward John and Selina Nicholson, of 2, Culver Rd., Saltash, Cornwall.
HMS Defence was sunk on 31 May 1916 during the Battle of Jutland. This was the largest naval battle of the war. Whilst escorting the main body of the Grand Fleet, HMS Defence was fired upon by the German battleship “Friedrich Der Grosse”; she was struck by two salvoes from the German ship that detonated her rear magazine. The fire from that explosion spread to the ship’s secondary magazines, they exploded in turn. There were no survivors.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and also on the War memorial in St. Johns Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Lance Corporal. Charles Robert OLVER. 28877, 7th Bn., Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry who died on 30 November 1917, age 21.

Son of Thomas and Rosabella Olver, of 21 Albert Rd., Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour ‘ Cambrai Memorial, Louverval, Nord, France and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Cambrai Memorial commemorates more than 7,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South Africa who died in the Battle of Cambrai in November and December 1917 and whose graves are not known.

Chief Engine Room Artificer 1st Class. Frederick Charles ORGAN. 140974, H.M.S. President, Royal Navy who died on 15 February 1920, age 54.

Husband of Ellen M. M. Organ, of Belle Vue House, Saltash. In the 1911 Census he was then a Naval Pensioner age 45, living at 45 Fore St Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ (and buried) in St. Stephen’s-By-Saltash Churchyard and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves

Commission. During WW1 HMS President was a Q-ships commissioned in response to German forces targeting civilian convoys of supply ships in the Atlantic. The Q-ships were brought into use during the summer of 1917, just in time to save Britain from defeat by Germany’s hugely effective U-boats, which sank more than 5,000 merchant ships during the Great War. The U-boat campaign in the First World War was monstrously effective coming close to bringing Britain to defeat.

Gunner T. Edward Warwick PEARN. H.M.S. “Princess Irene.”, Royal Navy died on 27 May 1915 age 42.

Son of Edward Thomas and Mary Pearn, of Saltash; husband of Blanche Mary Pearn, of Dunheved Villa, Saltash, Cornwall.
H.M.S. Princess Irene was a passenger liner converted to a minelayer. It was moored in the River Medway and had taken on mines brought down in barges from Woolwich. “On Thursday, May 27th 1915, the mines were being activated ready for a minelaying operation. As well as crew some dockyard men were on-board to strengthen the improvised gun decks. At 11.12am there was a tremendous explosion, then another. A dense cloud of vapour and smoke shot into the air in thousands of fragments. The end of the vessel was appalling, sudden and complete. She did not go down she simply went up and distributed her remains over an area of miles. 352 crew and dockyard men died in the disaster.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ Plymouth Naval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. Harry George S. PEARN. 13463, 2nd Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment who died on 16th August 1917.

The 1911 Census records Harry as single, 20 years of age, Grocers Assistant: living at 4 Albert Road Saltash, with his parents, Stephen & Amelia and his younger sister Bella Amelia.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Tyne Cot Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Tyne Cot Memorial stands around the eastern boundary of Tyne Cot Cemetery which is near the town of Ieper (Ypres) in Belgium. It bears the names of some 35,000 men of the British and New Zealand forces who have no known grave, nearly all of whom died between August 1917 and November 1918. This area on the Western Front was the scene of the Third Battle of Ypres. Also known as the Battle of Passchendaele, it was one of the major battles of the First World War.

Private. Roger Philip Russell PORTER. 50422, 14th Bn., Royal Warwickshire Regiment died on 03 February 1920 age 21.

Son of Roderick Porter (Solicitor), of “Glenside,” Port View, Saltash, Cornwall, and the late Ellen Loveday Porter.
Inscribed on a memorial plaque in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Church: “Architectural Student, the younger and surviving son. He served with his Regiment in France and Belgium, where he was gassed and wounded, in the Great War. He died [of his wounds] at Glenside, Saltash and was interred with his mother.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ (and buried) in St. Stephen’s-By-Saltash Churchyard. Also on the war Memorial in St. Johns Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Second Lieutenant. Roderick Spicer Russell PORTER. Indian Army Reserve of Officers died on 09 June 1916 age 26.

Son of Roderick Porter (Solicitor), of Glenside, Saltash, Cornwall, and the late Ellen Loveday Porter.
Inscribed on a memorial plaque in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Church: “Formerly of the Indian Army Reserve of Officers, attached to the 130th King Georges Own Baluchis. The elder son. Who was Killed in Action in the attack upon a Bridge on the Pangani River near Mkalamo, East Africa.”

‘Remembered with Honour’ in the Tanga European Cemetery and on the war Memorial in St. Johns Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

At the outbreak of the War Tanzania was the core of German East Africa. From the invasion of April 1915, Commonwealth forces fought a protracted and difficult campaign against a relatively small but highly skilled German force. Tanga was eventually occupied by a Commonwealth force on 7 July 1916 by naval and military forces. The Cemetery contains 29 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Captain. Alban PREEDY. 2nd Bn., Devonshire Regiment who died on 1st July 1916 age 23.

Son of the Rev. Canon Arthur Preedy and Beatrics J. Preedy, of Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Thiepval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Thiepval Memorial commemorates more than 72,000 men of British and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave, the majority of whom died during the Somme offensive of 1916. when some of the heaviest fighting of the First World War took place.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) list six Robert Arthur Preston’s – none of who have an obvious connection to Saltash. A Robert Arthur PRESTON is ‘Remembered with Honour’ on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash and there is, a Commander Robert Arthur PRESTON Royal Navy buried in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Churchyard.
My ‘best guess’, and it is only a guess, is that it is:

Commander. Robert Arthur PRESTON Royal Navy.

The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 the Commander Robert Arthur Preston buried in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Churchyard in 1911 was a 43 year old, Lieutenant Royal Navy, married to Amelia, living at ‘Sturston’, Essa Road, Saltash.
The 7th January1913 London Gazette records that:- “Lieutenant Robert Arthur PRESTON has this day been placed on the Retired List; with permission to assume the rank of Commander.” The Royal Navy Officers Medal Roll 1914-1920 shows he was awarded the British War Medal.
England & Wales deaths 1837-2007 Transcription says that he died in 1919 at Bodmin. Inscribed on his headstone is “To the Glory of God. In Loving Memory. ROBERT ARTHUR PRESTON. Commander Royal Navy. Who entered into rest March 5th, 1919.”

This Robert Arthur Preston is not one of the six who are ‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Lieutenant. William Reginald PRYN. 9th Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps died on 27 June 1915 Age 22

Son of William Wenmoth Pryn and lsabella Kate Pryn, of Yeoland, Yelverton, Devon.
The 1901 Census shows William, then age 8, was living with his Grandmother Margaret Coulter, age 61, a Widow, the head of that household, living on her own means at Home Park Place, Saltash.
The 1911 Census shows that William’s father, William Wenmoth Pryn, was a ‘Fleet Surgeon’ at Haslar Alverstoke Gosport, married to Isabella Kate (nee Coulter), Isabella born in Saltash. (I can’t find either William or his grandmother in the 1911 Census.)

‘Remembered with Honour’ Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

During the First World War, the village of Lijssenthoek was situated on the main communication line between the Allied military bases in the rear and the Ypres battlefields. Close to the Front, but out of the extreme range of most German field artillery, it became a natural place to establish casualty clearing stations. There are 9,901 members of the Commonwealth Forces buried in Lijssenthoek cemetery, 24 of whom are unidentified. All but 41 of the burials were for casualties who died while being treated at the medical facilities during the period 1914-1919.

Second Lieutenant. John Scarlet PYM. D.C.M) 6th Bn., The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) who died on 05 December 1916 Age 25.

Son of Walter H. J. Pym (Paymaster Capt., R.N.) and Flora (his wife), of “Sherwood,” Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ in the Wailly Orchard Cemetery. Pas de Calais. France: on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash and on a stained glass window in that church inscribed “To the glory of God and in dear memory of John Scarlet Pym DCM Scout Sargent Royal Canadian Dragoons afterwards Second Lieutenant the Queens Regiment killed in action on the River Somme 5th December 1916 only son of Flora and Walter H J Pym, Paym Captain Royal Navy.”
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Wailly Orchard Cemetery was begun in May as a front line cemetery, screened from German observation by a high wall. It contains 366 First World War burials, 15 of them unidentified.

Private. Edgar Harry PRYOR. 22694, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regiment who died on 22nd October 1916, age 21.

Son of Joseph Pryor, of Westbourne, Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Thiepval Memorial commemorates more than 72,000 men of British and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave, the majority of whom died during the Somme offensive of 1916.

Second Lieutenant. Joseph Stoneman PRYOR. 228th Field Coy., Royal Engineers who died on 25th March 1918, age 38.

Son of Joseph Pryor, of Westbourne, Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Pozieres Memorial, Somme, France and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Pozières Memorial is located near the commune of Pozières, in the Somme department of France. It lists the names of 14,657 British and South African soldiers of the Fifth and Fourth Armies with no known grave who were killed between 21 March 1918 and 7 August 1918.

Private. Charles Sidney RALPH. 3049, 24th Bn., Royal Fusiliers died on 05 April 1918 age 36.

Son of the late A. H. Ralph, of Stoke, Devonport; husband of Matilda Ralph, of The Railway Hotel, Saltash, Cornwall.
The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 he and Mathilda had been married for one year, they were both 29 years old, and that he was then the ‘Licensed Victualler’ of the Railway Hotel, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ in the Etaples Military Cemetery, Pas de Calias, France: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

During the First World War, the area around the small fishing port of Etaples Pas de Calias, France was the scene of immense concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals. It was remote from attack, except from aircraft, and accessible by railway from both the northern or the southern battlefields. At its peak, 100,000 troops were housed there with Commonwealth army training and reinforcement camps and an extensive complex of hospitals. Private. Charles Sidney Ralph died there of wounds he received in action at Bullecourt on the 24th March 1918.

Able Seaman. Charles Edward REDMAN. 181465, H.M.S. “Monmouth.”, Royal Navy who died on 01 November 1914 Age 35.

Son of Emmanuel and Margaret Ann Redman, of Saltash, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial: and on the War Memorial in St. Johns Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

From the Dingle & Co South East, Cornwall Almanac 1915:- On “November 5th The Secretary of the Admiralty reported that rumours and reports had been received from various sources of a naval action having taken place in the Pacific, off the Chilian coast. It was stated that the Scharnhorst, Gneisenau, Leipzig, Dresden and Nurenburg concentrated near Valparaiso, and that the engagement was fought with a portion of Admiral Cradock’s squadron on November 1st. The Germans report that the Monmouth was sunk and the Good Hope was severely damaged. The news caused a very painful impression in South East Cornwall, as the Monmouth was a west-country ship, and carried a crew of 537. From Saltash the men serving on her included Able Seaman C Redman.”

Private. George REEVES. 202021, 7th Bn., Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry who died on 24 March 1918.

The 1911 Census shows that he was then age 13, a scholar, living with his parents, William and Mary, and seven siblings at 11 Fore Street, Saltash.
The Soldiers died in the Great War 1914-1919 Transcription shows he was ‘killed in action’ on 24th March 1918.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Pozieres Memorial: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash. St. Johns Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Pozieres Memorial relates to the period of crisis in March and April 1918 when the Allied Fifth Army was driven back by overwhelming numbers across the former Somme battlefields, and the months that followed before the Advance to Victory, which began on 8th August 1918. The Memorial commemorates over 14,000 casualties of the United Kingdom and 300 of the South African Forces who have no known grave and who died on the Somme from 21 March to 7 August 1918.

Petty Officer. Jonathan REMICK.188412, H.M.S. “Monmouth.”, Royal Navy died on 01 November 1914 age 33.

Son of Mr. and Mrs. Remick, of Port Isaac, Cornwall.
The 1911 Census shows he was then aged 31, had been married to Emily for 3 years and they had one daughter. Their home was 78 Fore Street, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

From the Dingle & Co South East, Cornwall Almanac 1915: “On November 5th The Secretary of the Admiralty reported that rumours and reports had been received from various sources of a naval action having taken place in the Pacific, off the Chilian coast. It was stated that the Scharnhorst, Gneisenau, Leipzig, Dresden and Nurenburg concentrated near Valparaiso, and that the engagement was fought with a portion of Admiral Cradock’s squadron on November 1st. The Germans report that the Monmouth was sunk. The news caused a very painful impression in South East Cornwall, as the Monmouth was a west-country ship, and carried a crew of 537. From Saltash the men serving on her included Petty Officer J. Remick, married, with two children.”

Lieut-Commander Surgeon Quinton Hume RICHARDSON. H.M.S. Dragon, Royal Navy who died on 23 June 1919 Age 34.

Son of Deputy Insp. Gen. Hain Richardson, R.N., of “Pentamar,” Saltash; husband of Winifred Caroline Richardson, of 4, Coombe Villas, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ in the St. Stephen’s-By-Saltash Churchyard: and on the war Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

After commissioning in August 1918 HMS Dragon saw some brief war service with the 5th Light Cruiser Squadron in the Harwich Force. In 1919 HMS Dragon was a member of the Baltic Squadron. The Royal Navy Officers Medal Roll 1914-1920 records that Lieut-Commander Surgeon Quinton Hume Richardson was awarded the 1914-15 Star, Victory & British War Medals which were issued to his widow and that he died of illness.

Engine Room Artificer 1st Class. Benjamin SAMBELLS. D S M. 269327, H.M.S. “Vala.”, Royal Navy who died on 21 August 1917 Age 45.

Native of Keyham, Devonport. Son of Mrs. C. Sambells, of Sandleford, Saltash, Cornwall, and the late Mr.W. Sambells.

‘Remembered with Honour, Plymouth Naval Memorial: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash and on his family’s memorial in St. Stephen-by-Saltash Churchyard.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

HMS Vala was a ‘Q’ ship, so called because they were armed merchant vessels sent out to attract the attention of the German U-boats that were preying on allied shipping; they were there to be shot at. A lone merchant ship would be a tempting target for a submarine, and an unarmed ship would be unlikely to be attacked with a torpedo. Instead the submarine would surface and attempt to sink the ship with its cannon. When the sub surfaced the Q Ship would swing down its false sides and open fire with its concealed guns.
The Vala was a cargo ship launched in 1894. She had a busy time in the months preceding the 20th August. Between December 1916 and July 1917 she had been involved in fights with five different U-Boats, so presumably her appearance was reasonably well-known. When she was seen by UB-54, under Captain Egon von Werner, an experienced Submarine captain, she was in the Bay of Biscay one hundred and twenty miles south-west of the Scilly Isles, and H.M.S. Vala was not given the opportunity to bring her guns to bear. Instead von Werner ordered the launching of two torpedoes, and H.M.S. Vala was sunk. The crew of forty-five was lost.

Able Seaman. William George SCREECH. J/66673, H.M.S. Pegasus, Royal Navy who died on 12 November 1918 Age 31.

Husband of Gertrude Cook (formerly Screech), of 3, Ferguson St., Motherwell, Lanarkshire.
The British Royal Navy Seamen 1899-1924 Transcription show that Able Seaman. William SCREECH. J/66673 was born in Saltash.

His Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone shows he is buried and ‘Remembered with Honour’ in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Churchyard: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Probationary Flight Officer. Randolph Henry SEED. Royal Naval Air Service who died on 11 May 1917. Killed in a flying accident whilst training at RAF Chingford.

Born 4th January 1882 in Burma. He was living at 2 Magdala Villa, Saltash in 1914.

‘Remembered with Honour’ Chingford Mount Cemetery and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. Eddy (or Eddie) SMALE. 3187, 2nd/6th Bn., Devonshire Regiment who died on 20 June 1916.

The 1911 Census shows Eddy, aged 20, single, a ‘Labourer General’ living at The Beach, Saltash with his parents, John and Hannah Lane, an older brother in the Royal Navy and three younger siblings. A Medal Index Card shows Eddie as Soldier Number: 3187, Rank: Private, Devonshire Regiment. Soldiers died in the Great War 1914-1919 also shows Eddie as Soldier Number: 3187, Rank: Private, Devonshire Regiment.

‘Remembered with Honour ‘on the Basra Memorial, Iraq: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Basra Memorial commemorates more than 40,500 members of the Commonwealth forces who died in the operations in Mesopotamia whose graves are not known.

Lieutenant. James Stanley SMITH. Royal Field Artillery died on 30 April 1920.

Inscribed on his gravestone in St. Stephens-by-Saltash Churchyard: “Sacred to the memory of James Stanley Smith (Lieut R. F. A.) Beloved and devoted husband of Amanda Matilda Smith. Who entered into rest April 30th 1920 aged 31 years.”
England & Wales marriages 1837-2005 Transcription show that an Amanda M. Marshal married a James S. Smith in 1917 in St. German’s District. The Medal Index Cards Transcription shows he initially enlisted as a Private in the Royal North Devonshire Yeomanry but was Commissioned, first as a Second Lieutenant then promoted to Lieutenant, in the Royal Field Artillery.

‘Remembered with Honour’ St. Stephen’s-By-Saltash (St. Stephen) Churchyard: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private. William Victor TABB. 220031, 1st Bn, Wiltshire Regiment who died on 07 June 1917 Age 27

Husband of Daisy Louisa Tabb, of 48, Monument Street, Devonport. Soldiers died in the Great War 1914-1919 Transcription shows that he was born, resided and enlisted in Saltash: and that he was ‘killed in action’.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial: on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

The Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial is often referred to simply as the Menin Gate. It bears the names of more than 54,000 soldiers who died between October 1914 and September 1918 and who have no known grave. Hundreds of thousands of servicemen of the British Empire marched through the town of Ypres’s Menin Gate on their way to the battlefields and they did not return.

Private. Benjamin Crapp THORN. 64252, Devonshire Regiment who died on 27 October 1918.

The inscription on his gravestone says: “In loving memory of our dear son Benjamin Crapp Thorn who departed this life October the 27th 1915 in his 19th year. Peace perfect peace.” The 1911 Census shows he was then age 12, living with his parents, Joseph and Harriet, one older and two younger brothers at 1 Home Park Cottages, Saltash. British Army Service Records 1914-1920 show that he also served in the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) 16th Battalion: and other service records show that he served in the Labour Corps. He died of Pneumonia.

Remembered with Honour’ in St. Stephen’s-By-Saltash Churchyard: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Clerk 3rd Class. James Bassett TRETHEWEY. 280723, Royal Air Force who died on 05 November 1918 Age 42.

Husband of Emily L. A. Trethewey, of Dunheved, St. Stephen’s Road, Saltash. The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 he was a Monumental Mason, age 35, married for 6 years to Emily, living at Hatches Green Gunnislake Tavistock in the Parish of Calstock, Cornwall.

‘Remembered with Honour’ in Calstock Cemetery: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Gunner. Richard VEALE. 64990, Hughli Defences, Royal Garrison Artillery who died on 24 September 1918 Age 33.

Son of Annie Adams (formerly Veale), of 16, Tamar St., Saltash, Cornwall, and the late Isaac Veale, of Boxe’s Shop, St. Giles in the Heath, Launceston, Cornwall. The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 he was single, aged 26, a Farm Labourer, living with his Mother Annie Adams and Stepfather John Adams, at Antony Passage, St. Stephens, Saltash.

‘Remembered with Honour’ in Plymouth (Efford) Cemetery: and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church. Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Private Albert Ernest VOSPER. 785206, 3rd Bn., Canadian Infantry died on 28 September 1918 Age 26.

Son of Frederick L. and Hannah Vosper, of 2, Trelawny Villa, Saltash, Cornwall, England.

‘Remembered with Honour’ Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Ficheux, Pas de Calais, France: on the Canadian Virtual War Memorial and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

In September and October 1918 Casualty Clearing Stations came to Boisleux-au-Mont and extended the Bucquoy Road Cemetery. By the date of the Armistice, it contained 1,166 burials but this was greatly increased when graves were brought in from the surrounding battlefields and from small cemeteries in the neighborhood. The cemetery now contains 1,901 burials and commemorations of the First World War: UK 1453, Canada 447, India 1, Total Burials: 1901.

Petty Officer. Albert WATTERS. 213782, H.M. S/M. H10, Royal Navy died on 19 January 1918.

Husband of Frances Watters, of 116, Fore St., Saltash, Cornwall. The 1911 Census shows that in 1911 he was a Seaman RN, age 25, married to Amy(?) Watters and living with her family at 116 Fore Street Saltash Cornwall. WW1 Naval Casualties Transcription shows his date of birth as 11 May 1885 and that his wife’s first name was Frances of 116 Fore Street, Saltash.
H. M. Submarine. H10 was lost in the North Sea on or about the 19 January 1918 – cause unknown. The submarine had a complement of twenty-two crew members – none survived.

‘Remembered with Honour’ on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

I am not sure if Albert Watters is on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas & St. Faith Church, Saltash or not. There is an Albert Walters DSM (not Watters), on the Memorial which could possibly be a miss-spelling? I can’t find Albert Walters DSM ‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the CWGC.

Sick Berth Steward. George Alfred Warren Forbes WHITE. 351134, H.M.S. “Vivid.”, Royal Navy who died on 01 November 1918.

First name initials only on the Borough of Saltash WW1 1914-1918 Memorial and on his Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone.
George A. W. Forbes White on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas and St. Faith Church. George Albert Warren Forbes White on WW1 Naval Casualties Transcription: His widow was Henrietta. 15 Wall End Barking Road, East Ham.E. He died from disease.
(HMS Vivid the Navy barracks at Devonport in 1918 was renamed HMS Drake in 1934).

‘Remembered with Honour’ in Plymouth (Ford Park) Cemetery and on the War Memorial in St. John’s Chapel inside St. Nicholas and St. Faith Church, Saltash.
‘Commemorated in perpetuity’ by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.